Measure microscopes performance & detect issues

You don’t know if you don’t measure it.

Troubleshooting microscopes or performing quality control starts with you having the relevant information. You need reliable information, quickly! so you can take the right action and save the situation.

But time-efficiency does not mean cutting back on information. We give you the best information/time ratio possible from a quick 5 minutes check or a 1 hour in-depth performance assessment.

Discover Argolight Troubleshooting and Quality Control software, DAYBOOK
Daybook works with Argolight hardware solutions

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Analyze

More than 10 automated quality tests, several tens of relevant metrics.

Field uniformity test icon
Field distortion test icon
Lateral co-registration accuracy test icon
Line spread function test icon
Lateral Resolution test icon
stage repositionning repeatability test icon
Stage drift during Z stacking test icon
Intensity response test icon
Spectral response test icon
Field uniformity Test

The field uniformity is a well-known parameter related to the inhomogeneous spatial distribution of the intensity in the image of an even object.

In any fluorescence microscope, the knowledge of the field uniformity is important when the image intensity information is aimed to be measured. For intensity quantification in images of biological samples, the field uniformity shall be known, and eventually corrected, to have access to accurate measurements.

The “field uniformity” analysis provides the spatial distribution of the intensity, due to illumination and collection inhomogeneities, within the field of view.

Matrix of Rings pattern available on

Matrix of rings pattern of Argolight slides
Illumination inhomogeneity test result window

Test result (click to zoom in)

Lateral Resolution Test

The lateral resolution is the minimal distance between two objects close to each other that an imaging system can clearly measure. There are different ways to measure the lateral resolution. The method used in this analysis relies on the contrast transfer function, i.e. the measured contrast vs the measured distance between gradually spaced lines.

The “lateral resolution” analysis provides the minimal resolvable distance between lines close to each other, for a given contrast value, with an associated signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) value in the image.

Gradually Spaced Lines pattern available on

Gradually Spaced Lines  pattern of Argolight slides
Lateral Resolving Power test result window

Test result (click to zoom in)

Field Distortion Test

The field distortion is an optical aberration inducing a spatial deformation of the imaged object, usually at the corners of the image. In the presence of field distortion, the magnification is not constant over the field of view; it is dependent on the XY coordinates.

In any fluorescence microscope, the knowledge of the field distortion is important when spatial information in an image is aimed to be measured. For positions, lengths, areas or volumes quantification in images of biological samples, the field distortion shall be known, and eventually corrected, to have access to accurate measurements.

The “field distortion” analysis provides the lateral shifts, due to distortion, within the field of view.

Matrix of Rings pattern available on

Matrix of rings pattern of Argolight slides
Field distortion test result window

Test result (click to zoom in)

Intensity Response Test

The intensity response of a fluorescence microscope expresses the output digital signal to an input photon flux. It includes many aspects, such as the sensitivity, responsivity, limit of detection, limit of saturation and linear dynamic range.

In any fluorescence microscope, the knowledge of the intensity response is important when the intensity quantification in an image of a biological sample is aimed to be performed. Indeed, the overall intensity response may evolve over time, because of illumination path issues, collection path issues, detector aging, etc.

The “intensity response” analysis provides the intensity response of the imaging system to 16 intensity levels following a linear evolution, as well as quantitative parameters such as intensity values and pattern dynamic range. Monitoring these parameters allows to observe how the intensity response evolves over time, with respect to reference values.

4x4 or 2x16 Intensity pattern available on

4x4 intensity pattern of Argolight slides
Intensity response test result window

Test result (click to zoom in)

Line Spread Function Test

The line spread function (LSF) gives access to the spreading behavior of the light by a line object. Fitting the LSF with a mathematical function (Gaussian, Lorentzian, Sech²) allows to extract the full width at half maximum (FWHM), which is a parameter related to the lateral resolution of the imaging system.

The “line spread function” analysis provides information, in the XY plane, on how light spreads from a line, as well as quantitative parameters such as the FHWM of the LSF and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) value in the image.

Matrix of Rings pattern available on

Matrix of rings pattern of Argolight slides
Line spread function test result window

Test result (click to zoom in)

Stage Drift During Z Stacking Test

During the acquisition of image Z-stacks, the lateral stage may drift. Therefore, it is important to ensure that the XY stage do not drift too much. Sources of stage drift can origin from the environmental conditions, such as temperature fluctuations and air flow.

The “stage drift during Z-stacking” analysis allows to determine the XY stage drift during Z-stacking, to ensure it is within the specifications.

Crossing Stairs pattern available on

Crossing stairs pattern of Argolight slides
Stage drift during Z stacking test result window

Test result (click to zoom in)

Spectral Response Test

Fluorescence microscopes, although conceived preliminary to be imaging systems, can also acquire emission spectra, with a better spatial resolution but poorer spectral resolution than conventional spectrometers. The spectral response of a microscope expresses the responsivity of the imaging system versus the emission wavelengths.

Correct interpretation of the emission spectra measured with a microscope requires the knowledge of its spectral response.

The “spectral response” analysis provides the normalized detection efficiency versus the emission wavelengths, as well as quantitative parameters such as the spectral roll-off.

Spectral response test result window

Test result (click to zoom in)

Lateral co-registration accuracy Test

The co-registration accuracy is the ability of a fluorescence microscope to record images of a multi-labeled object without introducing additional shifts that would not be related to the object itself.

In any fluorescence microscope, the knowledge of the co-registration accuracy, both in the lateral and axial directions, is important when color information in an image is aimed to be used. For co-localization quantification in images of biological samples stained with several labels, the co-registration accuracy between the different channels shall be known, and eventually corrected, to prevent from misinterpretation.

The “lateral co-registration accuracy” analysis provides the lateral shifts between two channels, due to the co-registration inaccuracy, within the entire field of view.

Matrix of Rings pattern available on

Matrix of rings pattern of Argolight slides
Lateral Chromatic shifts test result window

Test result (click to zoom in)

Stage Drift During Timelapse

When performing timelapse imaging, it is important to ensure that the XY stage do not drift too much. Sources of stage drift can origin from the environmental conditions, such as temperature fluctuations and air flow.

The “stage drift during timelapse” analysis allows to measure the XY stage drift during a timelapse imaging, to ensure it is within the specifications.

Stage Repositioning Repeatability Test

During the acquisition of image tiles, the lateral stage may not reposition to some location in a repeatable way. Therefore, it is important to ensure that the XY stage repositioning repeatability is sufficiently accurate when tiling and stitching large regions in 2D or 3D.

The “stage repositioning repeatability” analysis allows to determine the XY motorized stage repositioning repeatability after many round trips, to ensure it is within the specifications.

Stage Drift During Timelapse test result

Test result (click to zoom in)

Detect

Set tolerance thresholds 

You are not efficient when you spend time demonstrating that systems work well.

Quality thresholds are the solution. Show right away that systems are performing and focus on the real issues. 

You can select one or two threshold values and the orientation of the traffic light colors.

Automate 

Batch process images 

Do you have several systems to assess? Stop wasting time when processing images one by one. Batch processing in Daybook analyzes multiple images at once.

Choose a naming convention, load your images and there you go!

ISO Compliance

Daybook software is compliant with the ISO 21073:2019 norm entitled “Optical data of fluorescence confocal microscopes for biological imaging” > Learn more about ISO 21073

Choose the right plan for you

Daybook comes in two plans. Choose the one that fits your needs.

Download Daybook 3 today

The time-efficient software for troubleshooting and quality control on microscopes.